October 1, 2014
everlyndunham:

Burr-lesque
No words can describe how much i need this.

everlyndunham:

Burr-lesque

No words can describe how much i need this.

(via talecanons)

September 30, 2014

recoveryisbeautiful:

justablueumbrella:

You’re gonna need a pep talk sometimes. That’s okay. For now, remember this: You’re awake. You’re awesome. Live like it.

IT’S OKAY ABOUT ALL THE MESS UPS

i love this kid

(Source: sohapppily, via queenkatiee)

September 30, 2014

ms1776:

Surrender of Lord Cornwallis detail of Alexander Hamilton, John Laurens, and Walter Stuart.

(Source: allabouthistory76)

September 30, 2014
everlyndunham:

Burr-lesque
No words can describe how much i need this.

everlyndunham:

Burr-lesque

No words can describe how much i need this.

(via talecanons)

7:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZZ6aWy1S3Usac
  
Filed under: aaron burr oh my God 
September 30, 2014

Just tore up an old suicide note I found while packing for the move tomorrow. Personal growth?

7:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZZ6aWy1S3RfZR
  
Filed under: :) 
September 29, 2014
submissivedreamer:

thinksquad:

Utah is ending homelessness by giving people an apartment or home.
Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.
Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.
City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.
Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.
Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.
Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.
This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.
How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail says for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but the keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

Wait. So you mean NOT treating them like scum and trying to be good human beings and help them out actually gives good results?
Who would have thought that giving people homes would actually reduce the number of homeless people?

submissivedreamer:

thinksquad:

Utah is ending homelessness by giving people an apartment or home.

Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.

Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.

City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.

Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.

Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.

Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.

This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.

How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail says for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but the keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

Wait. So you mean NOT treating them like scum and trying to be good human beings and help them out actually gives good results?

Who would have thought that giving people homes would actually reduce the number of homeless people?

(Source: thinksquad, via majestic-jc)

September 29, 2014

ancientart:

Sleeping Hermaphroditos, a Roman Imperial work (2nd century AD), which was discovered near the Baths of Diocletian in Rome, and probably inspired by a Greek original of the 2nd century BC. The mattress was sculpted by Bernini. 

With the voluptuous curves, one might assume walking by this sculpture, without closer observation, that a female is depicted. Hermaphroditos was actually a male, the son of Hermes and Aphrodite, and is depicted here as a bisexed figure. The sculpture, and those like it, raise profound questions about the nature of arousal and desire.

The following sections are written by Astier Marie-Bénédicte of the Louvre, and are all worth a read:

The story of Hermaphroditos:

There is nothing improper in this work, but it still intrigues the viewer. Hermaphroditos, had rejected the advances of the nymph Salmacis. Unable to resign herself to this rejection, Salmacis persuaded Zeus to merge their two bodies forever, hence the strange union producing one bisexed being with male sexual organs and the voluptuous curves of a woman. Stretched out in erotic abandon on the mattress provided by Bernini, the figure sleeps. Yet Hermaphroditos has only fallen half asleep: the twisting pose of the body and the tension apparent down to the slightly raised left foot are indicative of a dream state.

An embodiment of Hellenistic taste:

[…] The subject reflects the taste for languid nudes, surprise effects, and theatricality, all of which were prized in the late Hellenistic period. The work is designed to be viewed in two stages. First impressions are of a gracious and sensuous body that leads one to think that the figure is a female nude in the Hellenistic tradition; this effect is heightened here by the sinuousness of the pose. The other side of the statue then brings a surprise, revealing the figure’s androgynous nature by means of the crudest realism. This effect of contrast and ambiguity, indeed this taste for the strange that plays with the viewer’s emotions, is the result of the theatricality of some Hellenistic art. This utopian combination of two sexes is sometimes interpreted as a half-playful, half-erotic creation, designed to illustrate Platonic and more general philosophical reflections on love. 

Courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France: Ma 231. Photos taken by Anne-Marie Bouché.

(via thepoorinspirit-extras)

September 28, 2014

(Source: cholna, via matrixrefugee)

10:04pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZZ6aWy1RwPAqg
  
Filed under: art photography 
September 28, 2014

adreciclarte:

THE MAKING OF “IN VOLUPTAS MORS” – SALVADOR DALI BY PHILIPPE HALSMAN

 

(Source: una-lady-italiana, via witchy-w0man)

September 28, 2014

future-mrs-frost:

 

puphei:

The girl in the background made the blonde girl’s desktop background a picture of her holding a sign that said “Hi there. So um…Will you be my girlfriend?” while she was in the bathroom. This is the girl’s response. 

THIS IS THE CUTEST THING ASDFGHJKL

(Source: forgetaboutcait, via shamblingshitpickle)